THE FEMININE TAO 
CHAPTER THIRTY-TWO
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Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) (Intro) : 32 Nature Mystic Chapters :
gender-inclusive translations, calligraphy, commentary, seal scripts :

01, 04, 06, 07, 08    09, 10, 11, 15, 21, 22, 23    26, 28, 29, 32, 35,
40, 43, 45, 47    48, 49, 51, 52, 56, 63, 67    70, 73, 77, 79.
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Hymning the Tao Te Ching
(Literal 81 Chapter Chinese-English Study Version)
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Hyperlinked Bibliography: Women Authors on the Tao Te Ching
The Woman Crookback (Chuang-Tzu / Zhuangzi)
Picturing Tao (photo above: Sign with No Sign)
Women's Prehistoric Jomon Pottery
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Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Stephen Mitchell (1988)

The Tao can't be perceived.
Smaller than an electron,
it contains uncountable galaxies.

If powerful men and women
could remain centered in the Tao,
all things would be in harmony.
The world would become a paradise.
All people would be at peace,
and the law would be written in
their hearts.      

When you have names and forms,
know that they are provisional.
When you have institutions,
know where their functions should end.
Knowing when to stop,
you can avoid any danger.

All things end in the Tao
as rivers flow into the sea.

---


Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by J. H. McDonald (1996)

The Tao is nameless and unchanging.
Although it appears insignificant,
nothing in the world can contain it.

If a ruler abides by its principles,
then her people will willingly follow.
Heaven would then reign on earth,
like sweet rain falling on paradise.
People would have no need for laws,
because the law would be written on
      their hearts.

Naming is a necessity for order,
but naming cannot order all things.
Naming often makes things impersonal,
so we should know when naming should end.
Knowing when to stop naming,
you can avoid the pitfall it brings.

All things end in the Tao
just as the small streams and the largest rivers
flow through valleys to the sea.

---

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Shrine of Wisdom (1924)

Immutable Tao has no name.

Small though It appears in Its original simplicity,
the servant of Tao may stand against the world.


(1) Tao (2) commonly (3) has no (4) name.
(5) uncarved wood (6) though (7) insignificant (8) in heaven (9) below
(10) no one (11) is able (12 to subject it (13) even so

Could a king hold and keep It, the world of itself would submit at once
to him and spontaneously pay homage. Heaven and Earth would unite
to nourish him, and all people without pressure would harmonize in peace.

When Tao proceeds to action, It has a name. Having a name, men may
learn how to rest in It; knowing how to rest in It, they are free
from error and decay.

Tao is to the world like the great river and the sea are to the streams
from the valleys.

---

Chinese Character for Guest, Yu
[Arrive as a] GUEST (欲 = Yu)
Pictograph = Brings presents [shells]
to the home

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Ellen M. Chen (1989)

Tao everlasting
Is the nameless uncarved wood.
Though small,
Nothing under heaven can subjugate it.
If kings and barons can abide by it,
All creatures will arrive as guests to a banquet.

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) nobles (2) and kings (3) if (4) they were able (5) to abide by (6) the same
(7) ten thousand (8) things (9) would arrive (10) of themselves naturally (11) as guests

Heaven and earth unite,
To send down sweet rain.
Without being commanded by the people
It falls evenly by itself.

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) heaven (2) and earth (3) each other (4) join (5) thus so (6) surrender (7) sweet (8) dew
(9) the people (10) none (11) the same (12) command it (13) but (14) by itself (15) falls evenly

At the beginning of institutions names come to be.
Once there are names,
One must know when to stop.
One who knows when to stop does not become exhausted.

Tao in the world is like
Valley streams flowing into rivers and seas.

---

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Stephany Lane Yarbrough (2010)

The Tao is nameless,
Small, simple,
Yet commands all.

If powerful women and men
Would abide by the Tao
All would be at peace.
Heaven and Earth would join
In harmony.

Names appeared
Through the diversification
Of Energy.
The Wise who know
To stop and be still
Are exempt from danger.

Oceans are at one with the Tao
As rivers run into the sea.

---

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Tolbert McCarroll (1982)

The Tao is forever nameless.

Though the Uncarved Block is small,
it is not inferior to anything under heaven.
lf leaders could keep hold of it,
the ten thousand things would submit to them freely.
Heaven and earth would unite and sweet dew would fall. [*]
The people would live in harmony
without any law or decree.

Only when the Block is carved are there names.
As soon as there are names it is time to stop.
Knowing when to stop prevents trouble.

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) in the beginning (2) managing (3) has (4) names
(5) the names (6) likewise (7) are enough (8) to have
(9) surely (10) likewise (11) then (12) to know (13) to stop
(14) knowing (15) to stop (16) thusly (17) can be (18) not (19) wearing out

All under heaven will return to the Tao
as brooks and streams flow home to the sea.

---
[*] RED PINE [translator] comments:
"Sweet dew: the saliva produced during meditation by pressing the tongue
against the roof of the mouth. An essential element in the creation of a
pure body capable of transcending death."


(1) 'tis similar (2) Tao (3) the same's (4) existence (5) [in] heaven (6) below
(7) to (8) a river's (9) valley (10) the same (10) compared to
(11) [flowing] rivers (12) and seas

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Ursula K. Le Guin (1998)

The way goes on forever nameless.
Uncut wood, nothing important,
yet nobody under heaven
dare try to carve it.
If rulers and leaders could use it,
the ten thousand things would drop sweet dew,
and people without being ordered,
would be fair to one another.

To order, to govern,
is to begin naming;
when names proliferate
it's time to stop.
If you know when to stop
You're in no danger.

The Way in the world
is as a stream to a valley, [*]
a river to the sea.

---
[*] ZEN MASTER DOGEN (13th c.) in the
HOTSU BODAI SHIN says:
"When the ocean dries up,
the bottom remains,
though a person dies,
the [true] mind remains."
---

Chinese Character for Join, He
UNION / JOIN / HARMONIZE (合= He)
Pictograph = Many voices as one

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Livia Kohn (1993)

The Tao — eternal, nameless, simple.
Though small
It is subject to neither heaven nor earth.

Kings and lords maintain it,
And the myriad beings come to them.
Heaven and earth are in harmony,
And sweet dew falls.

People do not order it,
It is everywhere equally.

First you control it, then names appear.
Yet once there are names,
Knowledge must arise of when to stop.
Know when to stop
And you will never perish.

Compare how Tao is in all-under-heaven
To the converging of rivers and valleys
Toward the great streams and endless oceans.

---

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching / Chapter Thirty-Two in Seal Script
(Zhuanshu 篆文, with Wang Pi / Wang Bi Version)
Chapter 32 Seal Script & Interlinear English

(1) Tao (2) commonly (3) has no (4) name
(5) uncarved wood (6) though (7) insignificant (8) in heaven (9) below (10) no one (11) is able
(12 to subject it (13) even so

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) nobles (2) and kings (3) if (4) they were able (5) to abide by (6) the same
(7) ten thousand (8) things (9) would arrive (10) of themselves naturally (11) as guests

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) heaven (2) and earth (3) each other (4) join (5) thus so (6) surrender (7) sweet (8) dew
(9) the people (10) none (11) the same (12) command it (13) but (14) by itself (15) falls evenly

TAO TE CHING SEAL SCRIPT
(1) in the beginning (2) managing (3) has (4) names
(5) the names (6) likewise (7) are enough (8) to have
(9) surely (10) likewise (11) then (12) to know (13) to stop
(14) knowing (15) to stop (16) thusly (17) can be (18) not (19) wearing out


(1) 'tis similar (2) Tao (3) the same's (4) existence (5) [in] heaven (6) below
(7) to (8) a river's (9) valley (10) the same (10) compared to (11) [flowing] rivers (12) and seas

 
Tao Te Ching: Chapter 32
translated by Frank J. MacHovec (1962)

Tao is absolute, nameless.
A piece of wood, uncarved, natural, cannot be used by anyone.
The leaders who can be as genuine and natural as this
gain the respect of the people.

The heavens and the earth join and gentle rains fall,
beyond anyone’s command, to everyone equally.

When civilization grew, names began.
With names, one should know where to stop.
Whoever knows this has security.

In the world Tao is like rain that falls into the rivers
and thence to the open sea.

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